As Life and afterlife at Duxford, Cambridgeshire: archaeology and community in a chalkland community by Alice Lyons describes, investigations provided evidence for human activity over a period of at least two and a half thousand years. The hilltop was the site of an early Iron Age ‘crouched’ inhumation burial. During the middle Iron Age a probable ritual structure was accompanied by human and animal inhumations, while numerous grain silos were backfilled with ‘ritual’ deposits and possible feasting waste. A stock enclosure and numerous further storage pits were dug on the lower ground, the disuse fills of which contained additional evidence for the deposition of possible feasting waste and placed ‘special’ deposits. During the late Iron Age the higher ground was defined by a series of ditches and a short-lived timber-framed rectangular shrine.

The late Roman period saw the construction of a substantial drying building, and in the early Saxon era, there were three sunken-featured buildings and a post-built structure yielding a range of artefacts associated with textile working. As Life and afterlife at Duxford, Cambridgeshire: archaeology and community in a chalkland community by Alice Lyons describes, investigations provided evidence for human activity over a period of at least two and a half thousand years. The hilltop was the site of an early Iron Age ‘crouched’ inhumation burial. During the middle Iron Age a probable ritual structure was accompanied by human and animal inhumations, while numerous grain silos were backfilled with ‘ritual’ deposits and possible feasting waste. A stock enclosure and numerous further storage pits were dug on the lower ground, the disuse fills of which contained additional evidence for the deposition of possible feasting waste and placed ‘special’ deposits. During the late Iron Age the higher ground was defined by a series of ditches and a short-lived timber-framed rectangular shrine.

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